Jason and Fran’s Tips on – Racquetball Skills, Strategies, and Techniques:

Control center court: Being in the center-court box puts you in the best position possible to get a majority of the shots. Keep your opponent out of center court: If you keep the other player out of your space, they are not in the best position to get to a majority of the shots. You can accomplish this by putting the balls in the corners and hitting lots of down-the-line shots. Watch the ball at all times: By watching the ball, you gain valuable information and more time so you can better determine your opponent’s shot and react faster to

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Diana’s Tips on Nutrition:

Breakfast means "break the fast". That is what breakfast is all about, but too many people/players do not eat breakfast at all or do not eat enough breakfast especially if they have a match in the morning.  If you expect your body and mind to perform at its best you must eat. Here is what Diana recommends for breakfast: Breakfast of Champions consists of whole grain cereals, fruit and juice, or eggs, toast and fruit, or hot oatmeal, yogurt, and fruit. All of these good wholesome foods turn into muscle glycogen. Stay away from white flour, white sugar, chemicals, fats

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Diana’s Tips On Mental Toughness:

One must train the mind for "Championship Racquetball." The strongest sense we have is our feeling state, what we call our 'Emotional State". If it feels great, we continue doing it. If it does not feel good, we stop the pattern. So you have to feel great out on the court all the time. The greatest performances come from a state of enjoyment. We take risks, take chances, and are more creative in this state. If you are not enjoying racquetball, why are you playing? Your ideal state is always happy, calm, relaxed, and in control. No worries. Your passion

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Dan’s Tips on Conditioning:

CHANGE OF DIRECTION SPEED is an often overlooked element of movement skills, but it is the most important in racquetball. There are four types of change of direction speed that we’ll work on: side to side, forward and backward, turning and running, and jumping. Now that we have addressed moving faster, let’s talk about moving more efficiently. In this sport, if you move quickly, but not efficiently you will often overrun the ball or jam yourself. This is a major problem since you will not be able to develop consistency, accuracy, or power, leading to frustration. The key factor in

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Jason and Fran’s Tips on – Racquetball Skills, Strategies, and Techniques:

Shot selection is defined as taking the right shot at the right time and making your opponent run the farthest distance to get to the ball. It is the offensive player’s (the one hitting the ball) choice of shots based on himself, the ball, the opponent, and the score. When many of us get into the heat of the battle, we don’t think about our shots—we just bang away and play what we call survival racquetball. You may be guilty of hitting the shot you like or that you feel comfortable with rather than the most effective shot that will

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Diana’s Tips on Mental Toughness

One must train the mind for "Championship Racquetball". Athletes thrive on consistency and routine. We are creatures of habit and perform best when there are no surprises. In order to obtain optimal performance levels, your "Championship Game", you need a pre-performance routine. What Is a Routine or Ritual? 1. Behavior: An athlete chooses certain behaviors that enhance her game (e.g., bouncing the ball three times before serving). 2. Habit: A behavior done over and over again (seven times) becomes a habit. If you bounce the ball three times every time you serve, you will eventually do it unconsciously. 3. Routine:

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Dan’s Tips on Conditioning

POWER is another one of the key elements in conditioning you want to develop for your "Championship Game". Power is represented by speed over time. In other words, how quickly and with what certain force can you move? Or in sports, we think of “explosion” when we think of power. How quickly can you act, react or move with definite force? An example would be an offensive power ‘drive serve” which would be speed with force equaling POWER. There are specific exercises that develop your power and helps you to become more "explosive" into the ball, thus generating more power

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Diana’s Tips on Nutrition

Remember in the last issue in Fall 2011 we discussed racquetball muscles need “glycogen” in order to perform at their optimal level? Glycogen is a muscle energy source that comes from fruits, vegetables and whole grains or complex carbohydrates. Your brain needs glucose or blood sugar and your entire metabolism needs water. Racquetball muscles also need “amino acids” found in protein to repair your tissues and cells. We introduced the "championship meals" you need to eat in order to develop your championship game, so today I want to give you some "championship match tips" to help you reach your goals

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Diana’s Tips on Mental Toughness

One must train the mind for "Championship Racquetball." In Sports Psychology we talk about an athlete having two brains...one in your head and one in your "gut." You have the Learning Brain (head) and the Sports Brain (gut). 1. Learning Brain - this is the brain in your head where you are auditory and then visual. At first you listen to instructions (auditory)and once you have heard the message your brain tries to see or "visualize" the message. In this way you have heard it and then have seen it and now you are ready to try it. a.  Auditory Brain

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Diana’s Tips on Nutrition

Racquetball muscles need 'glycogen' in order to perform at their optimal level. Glycogen is a muscle energy source that comes from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains or complex carbohydrates. Your brain needs glucose or blood sugar and your entire metabolism needs water. Racquetball muscles also need 'amino acids' found in protein to repair your tissues and cells. Breakfast of Champions consists of whole grain cereals, fruit, and juice; or eggs, toast, fruit; or hot oatmeal cereal, yogurt, granola and fruit. All of these good wholesome foods turn into muscle glycogen. Stay away from white flour, white sugar, chemicals, fats, and preservatives. They

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